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CLAIRE M. METELITS

Dr. Claire M. Metelits, Associate Professor of Strategic Studies, teaches in the Security Studies Department at Command and Staff College, Marine Corps University. Prior to her 2018 arrival at MCU, Dr. Metelits was with American University in its School of International Service. She held academic positions with other institutions of higher learning, including Davidson College, and served as an advisor for U.S. Africa Command in Stuttgart, Germany and Djibouti in Africa.

Dr. Metelits’ research focuses on non-state armed actors, governance, and their intersection with local, regional, and international security. A major part of her research includes fieldwork and interviews with her subjects. While a large portion of her work has been conducted throughout the continent of Africa, she has also done research in countries such as Afghanistan, Iraq, Turkey, and Colombia.

Dr. Metelits’ publications include articles in Small Wars and Insurgencies, African Security, Defense and Security Analysis, Political Research Quarterly, Africa Today, and International Studies Perspectives. She is the author of Inside Insurgency (New York University Press) and Security in Africa (Rowman Littlefield), which was nominated for the Africa Studies Association’s Herskovitz Prize. She also co-edited Democratic Contestation on the Margins (Lexington Books).

Dr. Metelits earned her doctorate in political science from Northwestern University, her M.A. in international studies from the University of Denver, and her B.A. from Arizona State University.

Recent Publications:

“Bourdieu’s Capital and Insurgent Group Resilience: A Field-Theoretic Approach to the Polisario Front” Small Wars and Insurgencies 29, no. 4 (2018): 680-708. 

Security in Africa: A Critical Approach to Western Indicators of Threat. Rowman Littlefield (2016). 

“Challenging U.S. Security Assessments in Africa.” African Security 9, no. 2 (2016): 89-109.

“Back to the Drawing Board: What the Recent Peace Agreement Means for South Sudan.” Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs (2015).